Throwback Thursday: Choosing A Limited-Slip Differential

It’s hard to believe that another Thursday is barreling down on us, announcing the impending end of another work week. I don’t know about you, but I have already planned what I’ll be working on this weekend. If your plans involve project advancement – let’s just say a rearend upgrade, we can help with that. Once again, we celebrate another editorial look-back, and jump into the way back machine to open the Power Automedia vault that houses our vast collection of articles and revisit another great informational piece.

differential

The clutch-type differential was found in most GM cars with a limited-slip differential. You can upgrade them by running heavier springs.

In this Throwback Thursday, we’re taking a leap back to July 2015. That’s when we jumped head first into deciphering what differentials work best in what applications. We talked to the professionals at Eaton, so we could get you guys the information you need to make and informed decision. So, check out, To Lock Or Not To Lock: Choosing A Limited-Slip Differential.

Before we actually get into choosing a differential, do you actually understand the inner workings of one of these marvels of movement? It might be a good idea to gain some knowledge about the subject to make your understanding better. Fortunately, this article does that.

Eaton’s Truetrac operates as an open differential under normal driving conditions. But, when one wheel encounters a loss of traction, the gears engage and transfer torque to the wheel with traction.

In the original article, We take a look at the various Eaton-available differentials and explain how each works, and what the units construction means to you. If you’re looking for something that has the capability to be rebuilt, you have an option. If you’re looking for a differential that is virtually indestructible, this article explains the great option you have.

differential

Cone-type differentials have a friction surface embedded on the gear’s cone surfaces. They work when springs push them against the housing.

Selecting a differential for your ride is not something to take lightly, and for that reason, I feel that To Lock Or Not To Lock: Choosing A Limited-Slip Differential was a great piece to showcase in this week’s Throwback Thursday. You really need to check out the original article. You’ll be glad you did.

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About the author

Randy Bolig

Randy Bolig has been working on cars and has been involved in the hobby ever since he bought his first car when he was only 14 years old. His passion for performance got him noticed by many locals, and he began helping them modify their vehicles.
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